July 2017

Otata

Click on the links below to read

otata 19 July 2017

Ξ

Otata will come again
one day
late fall in the mountains

— Santoka as translated by Burton Watson

Otata mo aru hi wa kite kureru yama no aki fukaku

As Watson notes, “Otata was a woman who went around selling fish in the area of Santoka’s cottage in Matsuyama.”

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All works copyright © 2017 by the respective poets.

Address submissions to otatahaiku@gmail.com

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Akitsu Quarterly

Akitsu Quarterly, a print published by Robin White out of New Hampshire, is one of my favorite journals! It is a rich magazine, with outstanding images and haiga between the work of my favorite poets. Again, I’m happy to appear in it – thank you, Robin! Here is a selection:

a pair of slugs
their love-affair started
six miles east

AQ Fall 2016

the wind
gives nothing away
corn maze

AQ Winter 2016

a hawk teeters
above the cul-de-sac
wind chimes

AQ Spring 2017

finished
she turns kite string
into a chrysalis

AQ Summer 2017

© Tom Sacramona

 

Community No. 20

Digging Through The Fat

Thanks to Erica Goss, Tom Sacramona, Karen Paul Holmes, J. Alan Nelson, Anna Villegas, Fred Skolnik, Clive Collins, Oren Shafir, Steven Mayoff, and Lydia Armstrong for these links. We’re so proud to share your works with our Digging community. Congrats to all!

Erica Goss

Contemporary Realism

One, January 30, 2017
_

Early Morning, San Bernardino, 1969

Contrary, March 2016

Tom Sacramona

For Camille Claudel

The Scarecrow, February 16, 2017

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Stone Soldier

is/let, January 27, 2017

Karen Paul Holmes

The Woman Who Can’t Stop Taking Photos of Sunsets

Blue Five Notebook, May 2015

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Crossing Off Days

Cortland Review, Issue 72, August 2016

J. Alan Nelson

Time Pulled Apart

Review Americana, Spring 2008

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Can You Stop Reading Harry Potter A Moment

Commonline Journal, Winter 2009

Anna Villegas

College To Go

The Huffington Post, March 10, 2010

Only in My Dreams

The Eloquent Atheist, January 25, 2008

Fred…

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The Heron’s Nest, June 2017

The new issue of The Heron’s Nest came out today! I owe many thanks to editor Fay Aoyagi for accepting one of my poems for its inclusion. This is one of my favorite issues, with great work by Paul Miller and Hannah Mahoney and many others. These are poems to revisit again and again.

Check out The Heron’s Nest Volume XIX, Number 2: June 2017

crescent moon
a June bug
fills the telescope

Tom Sacramona
Plainville, Massachusetts

cattails – Editor’s Choice Haiku

The latest issue of cattails, under the new editorial direction of Sonam Chhoki, went live today, and I’m most grateful to Sonam Chhoki, Geethanjali Rajan, and Gautam Nadkarni for my poems inclusion in the journal.

I am especially thankful to Haiku Editor Geethanjali Rajan for selecting my poem, below, as an Editor’s Choice haiku.  This is the first time I’ve received this recognition – thank you!

Go to cattails April 2017 Issue to read more!

cattails Editor's Choice Haiku

For Camille Claudel

The Scarecrow February (Birth) edition just came out in PDF format!

I’m happy to have discovered the wonderful online publication The ScarecrowMany thanks to the editor for taking my poem inspired by a play I saw about the artist Camille Claudel. The Winnipesaukee Playhouse in Meredith, New Hampshire put on “The Waltz” back in September, and I was shocked and awed by the little known life of Camille Claudel, a master sculpture artist. She suffered later in life, unable to escape the shadow of her mentor, the most famous master sculptor, Auguste Rodin.

the light plays
with the master’s eyes
her marble torso

© Tom Sacramona

Please check out my tribute to Camille Claudel & to the wonderful play put on by the Winnipesaukee Playhouse, today the featured poem on The Scarecrow!

february, 2017

Thanks so much, John Martone!

Otata

Click on the links below to read

otata 14 (February 2017)

— and from otata’s bookshelf —

David Miller — From Late to Early

Ξ

Otata will come again
one day
late fall in the mountains

— Santoka as translated by Burton Watson

Otata mo aru hi wa kite kureru yama no aki fukaku

As Watson notes, “Otata was a woman who went around selling fish in the area of Santoka’s cottage in Matsuyama.”

.

All works copyright © 2017 by the respective poets.

Address submissions to otatahaiku@gmail.com

—John Martone

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